Facebook allows Moments-like app to be launched in China

Facebook allows Moments-like app to be launched in China

Facebook allows Moments-like app to be launched in China

But it has reportedly found a workaround in the form of Colorful Balloons.

App for sharing photos entitled Colorful Balloons for functions and appearance very similar to another company's product Facebook - Moments.

The social network has been secretly testing a photo sharing app called Colourful Balloons in the country, The New York Times reported on Friday.

The app has been created to collate photos from the photo albums of smartphones and share them. Sources told the New York Times that Facebook played a part in Colorful Balloons' creation, and even gave permission for the app to be released back in May through a separate company called Youge Internet Technology. The company is registered in Beijing and with no trace of affiliation with USA based Facebook.

However, the room number listed in company registration documents could not be found amid a series of shabby, small offices on the building's fourth floor.

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Facebook had to use audacious methods to circumvent the obstacles the Chinese government imposes.

That indicates she likely is associated with the social media giant.

Neither Facebook nor Jingmei has issued any official statement regarding their partnership.

The secretive approach of launching the app could cause additional difficulties for Facebook with the government of China that maintains strict oversight as well as control over tech companies outside China.

It was unclear if China's various internet regulators were aware of the app's existence, the Times said.

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Facebook has always been keen to find a way into China, where the social network has been banned since 2009.

China is the largest online market in the works.

Last month, in a crackdown on Internet services by the government, Apple had removed all major VPN apps from the App Store in China.

Earlier this week, Chinese officials announced they are probing social media sites WeChat and Weibo amongst others for not following policy related to censorship and content.

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